rotten-envy:

not all those who wander are lost

rotten-envy:

not all those who wander are lost

I had a cookie for breakfast so ya diet is going great

donkos:

reading a foreign language: yeah
writing in a foreign language: ok
listening to a foreign language: wait
speaking in a foreign language: fuck

travelingcolors:

Boardwalk, Cullite Creek | Canada (by Ben D. Johnson)

travelingcolors:

Boardwalk, Cullite Creek | Canada (by Ben D. Johnson)

fungii:

what have i found

fungii:

what have i found

#TARA 

#blessed

I surprised Mitchell with an easter basket of candy this morning and now he’s cooking me a little turkey dinner and everything is perfect :)

coffeeinthemountains:

via hankboughtabus.com

coffeeinthemountains:

via hankboughtabus.com

okaywork:

why do moms get so pissed about how many empty water bottles you have in your room 

just get a fucking reusable water bottle and stop sucking so much and maybe your mom would love you

distant-traveller:

Waterton lake eclipse 

Recorded on April 15th, this total lunar eclipse sequence looks south down icy Waterton Lake from the Waterton Lakes National Park in Alberta, Canada, planet Earth. The most distant horizon includes peaks in Glacier National Park, USA. An exposure every 10 minutes captured the Moon’s position and eclipse phase, as it arced, left to right, above the rugged skyline and Waterton town lights. In fact, the sequence effectively measures the roughly 80 minute duration of the total phase of the eclipse. Around 270 BC, the Greek astronomer Aristarchus also measured the duration of lunar eclipses - though probably without the benefit ofdigital clocks and cameras. Still, using geometry, he devised a simple and impressively accurate way to calculate the Moon’s distance, in terms of the radius of planet Earth, from the eclipse duration. This modern eclipse sequence also tracks the successive positions of Mars, above and right of the Moon, bright star Spica next to the reddened lunar disk, and Saturn to the left and below.

Image credit & copyright: Yuichi Takasaka / TWAN / www.blue-moon.ca

distant-traveller:

Waterton lake eclipse 

Recorded on April 15th, this total lunar eclipse sequence looks south down icy Waterton Lake from the Waterton Lakes National Park in Alberta, Canada, planet Earth. The most distant horizon includes peaks in Glacier National Park, USA. An exposure every 10 minutes captured the Moon’s position and eclipse phase, as it arced, left to right, above the rugged skyline and Waterton town lights. In fact, the sequence effectively measures the roughly 80 minute duration of the total phase of the eclipse. Around 270 BC, the Greek astronomer Aristarchus also measured the duration of lunar eclipses - though probably without the benefit ofdigital clocks and cameras. Still, using geometry, he devised a simple and impressively accurate way to calculate the Moon’s distance, in terms of the radius of planet Earth, from the eclipse duration. This modern eclipse sequence also tracks the successive positions of Mars, above and right of the Moon, bright star Spica next to the reddened lunar disk, and Saturn to the left and below.

Image credit & copyright: Yuichi Takasaka / TWAN / www.blue-moon.ca

I was so focused on pouring myself into you that I forgot I was becoming empty along the way.
lust4mtns:

Mt. Sneffels and Blue Lake 137 by ShaunRay on Flickr.

lust4mtns:

Mt. Sneffels and Blue Lake 137 by ShaunRay on Flickr.

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